Combat Alzheimer’s Disease with The Mediterranean Diet

Combat Alzheimer’s Disease with The Mediterranean Diet

A healthy diet is necessary for individuals in all stages of life. A balanced diet optimizes and fuels the body throughout the long hours of the day. Diet becomes even more important as a person ages, especially after the onset of a disease like Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disorder that devastates memory and thinking skills according to the National Institute of Aging (NIA). The slow but progressive disease is the most common cause of dementia and is usually detected in seniors. Though the disease is irreversible, it is important to maintain a healthy diet to combat its onset or progression. So, what do you eat to combat Alzheimer’s disease? According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), researchers have found that a Mediterranean diet slows down changes in the brain which leads to Alzheimer’s disease. The Mediterranean diet is a blend of traditional Mediterranean-style cooking with healthy eating recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Components of the Mediterranean diet: ...
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Ways to Reduce the Risk of Dementia

Ways to Reduce the Risk of Dementia

One of the most common health risks associated with seniors is the development of dementia. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently reported that dementia is a rapidly growing health problem. Right now, dementia affects about 50 million people worldwide. It is a major cause of disability and dependency among seniors, and it is a huge expense to victims and to the health care system. Dementia is not one disease, it is a group of symptoms that can be caused by several brain disorders. Alzheimer's disease is just one of several types of dementia, but it does account for most (60% to 80%) of dementia cases. The World Health Organization report confirms some points that your own doctor may have already told you: The cause of Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, is not known. Right now, there is no known cure for Alzheimer’s disease. There are some things you can do to reduce the likelihood of developing some dementias, including...
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Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

For decades, seniors and their loved ones have sometimes been confused by the terms, “dementia” and “Alzheimer’s disease.” Some people use the terms interchangeably, as if they were one and the same thing, but they are not. “Dementia” is a broad term that means a decline in mental function, including impaired thinking and memory. Although it is often associated with aging, dementia can occur in younger people and it may be caused by several different issues. Chronic alcoholism or drug abuse and Parkinson’s disease are sometimes the origin of a broad set of symptoms that doctors call “dementia.” Vascular dementia, caused by conditions that block or reduce blood flow to the brain, is the second most common cause of dementia in older people. Often, people don't suspect vascular dementia when forgetfulness becomes difficult. Whatever the cause, when these symptoms become severe enough to interfere with daily living, a physician may make the diagnosis of dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is a specific medical condition that...
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Alzheimer’s Disease vs. Sudden Memory Loss

Forgetting where you put your keys, the name of a song you just cannot get out of your head, or who was in your favorite movie, is a familiar experience for people of all ages. This type of minor memory loss becomes more common with age, but a sudden and extensive loss of important memory is a symptom that something is wrong. The public today is much more aware of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia than in the past, and most people know that Alzheimer’s disease does not cause a sudden and profound memory loss. It shows up slowly at first and progresses over a period of years. The sudden loss of important memory (like forgetting the name of your spouse or children) is almost certainly not due to Alzheimer’s disease, no matter the age of the victim. Transient Global Amnesia (TGA) is a condition in which the person is not able to form new memories or remember the recent...
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What Is Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease?

Most people think of Alzheimer’s disease as a medical condition that is seen only in older people. In most cases it is. In fact, Alzheimer’s disease is one of the greatest threats to our seniors. For that reason, OurSeniors.NET is especially concerned with helping find memory care living facilities, senior assisted living and quality in-home senior care for our seniors. Our mission is to be a senior directory, an all-things-senior resource for our readers and friends, and Alzheimer’s is one of the major challenges that seniors face. However, seniors are not entirely alone in confronting this disease. Up to 5% of all Alzheimer’s sufferers have what is known as “Early-Onset Alzheimer’s.” Physicians define this condition as any Alzheimer’s that manifests itself before the age of 65. It generally shows up in a person aged 40 to 50, but cases in people as young as 30 have been seen. The diagnosis is missed sometimes because medical personnel are just not looking for it....
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Diet and Alzheimer’s Disease

For years there has been speculation that some type of special diet or dietary supplement can halt or reverse Alzheimer’s disease. This subject has been investigated by hundreds of medical researchers without truly decisive results. However, a study published in the February 2015 Journal of the Alzheimer's Association strongly pointed to certain elements in diet that, over time, can affect the chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease. The internet and popular media are full of claims that this or that food, supplement or other ‘treatment’ can prevent or reverse Alzheimer’s and/or other forms of dementia. Some of these claims should be dismissed as wishful thinking or false advertising, and many are unproven speculation. Research into the MIND diet published in the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association is far more believable. The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (Alzheimer's & Dementia®: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association) is a peer-reviewed scientific-medical journal that covers the entire spectrum of research into Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. “Peer-reviewed”...
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An Alzheimer Patient Simply Left His Residence and Vanished

Let’s Not Let This Happen Again In 1983, President Ronald Reagan designated November as National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month. In that year “fewer than 2 million Americans had Alzheimer’s; today, the number of people with the disease has soared to nearly 5.4 million.” Over the years there has been an increased awareness of Alzheimer’s, more targeted research and better tools for diagnosis. However, there are no cures in sight and 5.4 million is a scary number, a number that doesn’t give any comfort to Seniors, family members, and health care professionals who are touched by the disease. Even those not close to senior age are worried about their own propensity for the disease. Once diagnosed an Alzheimer’s patient leads a life no longer their own. Patients on whom others depended are now the dependents. Families cope in different ways but the harrowing prospect of the future is crushing and unavoidable. One very public problem Alzheimer’s disease presents goes beyond the confines of family or...
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Dealing With Dementia

For both the patient and the caretaker or loved one, dementia is one of the most difficult medical conditions with which to deal. In dealing with dementia, the first thing you must overcome may very well be your own emotions. In many cases, dementia is the symptom of an underlying physical condition, but it shows itself as a change in personality, behavior or mental ability. It is easy to sympathize with a person suffering from knee or hip pain because of arthritis or shortness of breath due to heart disease. We understand that these symptoms are the result of physical changes in joints or blood vessels. Likewise, dementia is often produced by changes in the brain, but the symptoms are more difficult to understand. Instead of crying out in physical pain, the victim may become irritable, angry or even aggressive. They may forget recent events, become disoriented, have difficulty communicating or even forget who you are. The problems with memory loss...
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